Blog Homepage

Blog and News - Archive

Why you should ride a disc wheel in a time trial

One of the things that puzzles me the most when I rock up to a time trial, especially a significant one, is the lack of disc wheels on bikes.

At club level you could be forgiven, especially in Canberra where time trials are few and far between, as the disc is not a cheap bit of equipment.  On average you would be lucky to get to use it three of four times a year.  At over a thousand (and sometimes over two) dollars a pop, that equates to $250+ per ride for the year!  Even over a few years, maybe say 10-15 races, that’s still pretty expensive – more than the race entry fees themselves.

But costs aside there are a range of reasons that are often cited to justify not riding a disc, even when the rider has one available.  It’s too windy.  The course is too hilly.  It’s heavy. I am too small and not strong enough to push it.  These are the most common but in reality you should really be using a disc in 99% of cases. 

Here is why.

Read More

Jason Mahoney Thursday 26 September 2013 at 8:17 pm | | Tips | No comments

Assessing the quality of a training session

Previously I have posted an article which listed my four key training principles.  The first one of these was ‘Correct Intensity’.   Whilst it appears quite simple on the surface, this training principle can in fact be the hardest to get right.   Just knowing what the intensity of your ride is supposed to be isn’t enough to ensure that it meets it’s goal and even then doing the ride at what you think is the right pace doesn’t necessarily mean that it will be.

To illustrate this I have prepared a little case study of three ride files, all with the same purpose – Aerobic development through time spent in the E1 and E2 zones.

Read More

Jason Mahoney Wednesday 25 September 2013 at 10:42 am | | Tips | No comments

Getting the most out of your training effort – training vs racing

There is an old saying that racing is the best form of training.  However like many old adages this is only true some of the time.  Specifically for cycling it mainly holds true as you get closer to your target race and then usually when the format and course for the race suitably replicates the demands you expect to encounter during your main event.   At other times racing serves different purposes, for example allowing you to hone your race craft and tactics.  At other times racing can be one of the worst types of training.  If you want to know why, read on.

Read More

Jason Mahoney Monday 23 September 2013 at 08:38 am | | Tips | No comments

Know thy course

There were some ‘interesting’ happenings at this mornings Stage 1 Individual Time Trial for the National Capital Tour.  This race is a part of Cycling Australia’s National Road Series (NRS), so one of the premier races in the country this year.  However, as will all new events there can be teething problems but this morning’s issues were a little out of the ordinary and lead to some ‘interesting’ outcomes.

Without going into too much details, there was a traffic accident that lead to problems getting the course properly marked and marshals in place.  As a possible result of this a number of riders went off course and lost valuable time.  The end result was that a decision was made to nullify the times for GC and everyone would start stage 2 on equal time.    Some people will question whether that is a fair decision and while I have my own opinion, the purpose of this ‘brief’ post is to draw your attention to a different fact.  One that is paramount in success in any racing and that’s the importance of knowing the course.

For this morning’s race.  It was a NRS race will the countries top riders.  Now while some of these riders are still developing and finding their feet at this level, detailed course information is provided online well in advance of race day.  Cycling Australia, race organisers and Cycling Profiles all do a fantastic job of providing this information and they do if for one reason – so that everyone knows where to go!

As a coach I make it a point of ensuring all my riders know the course and when I race I make it my personal responsibility for knowing the route.  Far too often I have encountered marshals that are either not in place, not providing an indication of the route or just plain don’t know what’s going on.  So, I learnt my lesson long ago, but for today – for all those riders that got lucky with the decision to annul the race times, I hope they take a moment to consider whether they well and truly studied the course before hand and whether next time they would pay more attention to the maps that are provided.

It’s worth remembering that had this been a national championship or perhaps another significant event then a rider who ‘just happened to go off course’ would have to live with their additional time, or worse a disqualification. 

So, next time you have a time trial (or even a road race on an unfamiliar course) check out the race maps that are provided.  Have a printed copy with you on race day and study it in detail.  If you truly care about your results then care about the course!

 

 

 

Footnote:

Nb: I am aware of several instances today where traffic on course played a major role in a rider either being lead off course or from being prevented from following the course proper. Those riders will know who they are and obviously my comments above do not apply to them

 

Jason Mahoney Friday 20 September 2013 at 8:24 pm | | News, Tips | No comments

Self Handicapping, Externalisation and Internalisation

 

Previously I have written (here and here) of the importance of the mental skills for riders and their contribution to success in cycling.  This article is a follow up post to these topics and it’s perhaps one of the most important articles I have written on this site as it touches at the very heart a riders subconscious motivation when racing and training – which in turn affects overall performance and results.

The terms in the title refer to two important topics in sports psychology.  Self-handicapping is the conscious or sub-conscious practise of placing oneself in a situation where the lack of results will not negatively impact self image. It also includes creating or claiming obstacles prevented results. There are many examples of this in cycling.  One of the most common (and obvious) is race grades.  A ride will often race a grade above their ability so that when they fail to finish they can always save face by saying they were beaten by better riders – after all its better to get dropped and DNF from A grade than B grade, right (?).  Another is poor food intake or hydration where riders conveniently ‘forget’ to eat sufficient food or drink sufficiently fluids thus robbing themselves of a chance at success.

Externalisation and Internalisation are the two ways that we look at the ‘cause and effect’ relationship within the performance paradigm.   Riders who tend towards externalisation always look to blame someone or something else for their poor results and as such deprive themselves of a learning opportunity (see ‘should have, would have, could have’ for examples).  Riders who internalise tend towards analysing their own actions to determine whether they could have done something differently to change the result and as such they are always providing a path to improving their results.

The remainder of this article will look at these concepts in a little more detail, with an emphasis on helping you identify whether you are guilty of self-handicapping and whether you tend towards externalisation or internalisation.

Read More

Jason Mahoney Thursday 19 September 2013 at 08:44 am | | Tips | No comments

Crit Racing Masterclass sessions

Do you want to improve your crit racing skills and performance ahead of the summer criterium series?

After the success of the TT Masterclass session last week we are providing the perfect opportunity to develop your crit skills with a Crit Racing Masterclass session on Sun 20th October.

Two sessions are being offered, with a ‘women’s only’ session at 10:30 and an ‘open’ session at 1pm

Click the banner below to view more information on the Crit Racing Masterclass sessions and to reserve your place.

 

Pivotx Tags: ,

Jason Mahoney Wednesday 18 September 2013 at 11:20 am | | News | No comments

The importance of the Hip Flexors in correct bike set up

Since I started doing bike fitting (many years ago) there have been three things that consistently come up in fitting sessions:

  1. Saddle is too high
  2. Saddle is too far forward
  3. Tight hip flexors – predominantly on the left side

While the saddle position is a quick one to fix the hip flexor issue is something that cannot be addresses as easily.

The hip flexors play an important role in maintaining a balanced, powerful and pain free position on the bicycle.  An overly tight hip flexor, usually on just one side of the body, often leads to misaligned hips and in turn this negatively impacts the pedalling technique and can lead to a range of pains.

Read More

Jason Mahoney Monday 16 September 2013 at 08:51 am | | Tips | No comments

Mental attributes in elite level cyclists

This one is from a few years ago when I did my level 2 coaching quals.  It relates to the mental attributes that elite level cyclists and athletes have in common.  These are:

  • Discipline
  • Commitment
  • Dedication
  • Will to Win
  • Focus
  • Confidence
  • Self Centred
  • Self Belief
  • Resilience
  • Leadership
  • Emotionally Stable
  • Conscientious

Quite a good list.  Take a moment and have a think about each of these and what they mean to you.

 

Jason Mahoney Saturday 14 September 2013 at 3:21 pm | | Tips | No comments